Posts Tagged ‘aaos’

Sports Medicine Guide for the Media, or Anyone

If you want quick, easy-to-understand descriptions of some of the most common sports injuries, from ankle sprains to overuse injuries to rotator cuff tears, check out the new 33-page Sports Medicine Media Guide: An illustrated Resource on the Most Common Injuries and Treatments in Sports.

The new guide is now available online from the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Designed as a resource for sports reporters who want to simply and accurately explain common sports injuries, the guide can also help anyone who wants a quick reference to most of the major joint-related sports injuries.

For example, under Ankle Sprains, the guide defines what an ankle sprain is, how it can be treated (the tried-and-true initial step is the RICE formula: Rest, Ice Compression, Elevation), and how to prevent it.

The guide is divided into 20 sections, each focusing on a specific injury and providing information on causes, diagnosis, and treatment, as well as related definitions, statistics, and resources.

Under Statistics in the Ankle Sprain section, the guide notes that about 25,000 ankle sprains occur in the United States every day, making it one of the top 10 sports injuries.

Sections are written by an orthopedic surgeon or other medical professional specializing in the particular injury or condition who offers insight on what to expect in recovery, how to avoid injury, and how to get back into the game.

High-resolution photographs and medical illustrations provide additional detail to further explain the injury.

The guide includes sections on Ankle Sprains, AC Joint injuries, Articular Cartilage Injuries, Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries, Meniscal Tears, Shoulder Impingement, Stress Fractures, Rotator Cuff Tears, Shoulder Instability/Dislocations, SLAP Tears, Throwing Injuries in Children, and Overuse Injuries.

In addition, the guide contains information on such topics as Exercise and the Mature Athlete, Anabolic Steroids, MRSA (Staph) Infections, Heat Illness, Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes, and two very newsy topics, Concussions and Treatment of Tendon/Ligament Disorders with Platelet-Rich Plasma.

The Concussion section ends with the clear recommendation that all athletes who sustain a concussive episode, no matter how minor, undergo an evaluation by a medical physician before returning to play.

The illustrations for Ankle Sprains and ACL Injuries show particularly good detail, while other illustrations are very simple (AC Joint, Articular Cartilage, Meniscus, Shoulder Impingement and Dislocation).

The MRI of a Rotator Cuff Tear looks like a close-up photo of a fish eye, and should have been replaced by a clear illustration.

Also, there are glaring omissions in three of the most commonly injured joints, the neck, back, and elbow.

Overall, the guide is a fine place to find a very short overview of many joint injuries before you go to other websites for more details.