Posts Tagged ‘heart failure’

Exercise More, Sit Less to Prevent Heart Failure

Be more active and sit less and you’ll improve your chances of preventing heart failure.

That’s the message of the first study to provide evidence that high levels of sedentary time, even among physically active men, places them at risk for heart failure.

“The evidence of the effects of physical activity on heart failure is developing.

Our study adds to this by examining the associations in a large racially and ethnically diverse population.

We provide even more evidence that moving more and sitting less can lead to better health,” says lead author Deborah Rohm Young, PhD, research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research & Evaluation, Pasadena, CA.

Dr. Young and colleagues examined the electronic health records of nearly 83,000 men aged 45 years and older who were part of the California Men’s Health Study and had enrolled in Kaiser Permanente health plans in the Northern and Southern California regions.

The researchers published their results in the January 21, 2014 issue of the journal Circulation: Heart.

After monitoring these men for more than 10 years, they found that the risk of heart failure in those who reported high levels of sedentary time and low levels of physical activity was twice that in men who reported high physical activity and low sedentary time.

Although the researchers were not able to identify the types of exercise that the men did in the study, Dr. Young suggested that “brisk walking is a great form of physical activity.

It can be done almost anywhere, it does not require equipment, and most people of all ages can do it.”

She says that a brisk walk is “as if you’re in a hurry, and is defined as a 3- to 4-mile per hour pace or a 15- to 20-minute mile.”

To prevent heart disease, Dr. Young encourages men to meet the National Physical Activity Guideline—150 minutes per week of moderate intensity physical activity.

“We are still learning about the detrimental effects of high daily sedentary time,” she says.

“At this point, there is no consensus on how much sedentary time is too much.

Plus, our study only asked about sitting time outside of work.

But given the number of health benefits from being physically active, people should find ways to put physical activity into their lives and spend less time sitting.”

At Kaiser Permanente, clinicians have initiated an “Exercise Vital Sign” program in which all members are asked about their physical activity at every outpatient visit.

“The information is recorded in their electronic health record and is available for the health care providers when they see the patient.

It provides an opportunity for the provider to counsel the patient on physical activity levels,” Dr. Young says.

She suggests that primary care physicians ask their patients about their regular physical activity.

“When it’s insufficient, patients need to hear that regular physical activity is important for their health.

Physicians can be powerful advocates in helping to promote this message.”

Exercise More, Sit Less to Prevent Heart Failure

Be more active and sit less and you’ll improve your chances of preventing heart failure.

That’s the message of the first study to provide evidence that high levels of sedentary time, even among physically active men, places them at risk for heart failure.

“The evidence of the effects of physical activity on heart failure is developing.

Our study adds to this by examining the associations in a large racially and ethnically diverse population.

We provide even more evidence that moving more and sitting less can lead to better health,” says lead author Deborah Rohm Young, PhD, research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research & Evaluation, Pasadena, CA.

Dr. Young and colleagues examined the electronic health records of nearly 83,000 men aged 45 years and older who were part of the California Men’s Health Study and had enrolled in Kaiser Permanente health plans in the Northern and Southern California regions.

The researchers published their results in the January 21, 2014 issue of the journal Circulation: Heart.

After monitoring these men for more than 10 years, they found that the risk of heart failure in those who reported high levels of sedentary time and low levels of physical activity was twice that in men who reported high physical activity and low sedentary time.

Although the researchers were not able to identify the types of exercise that the men did in the study, Dr. Young suggested that “brisk walking is a great form of physical activity.

It can be done almost anywhere, it does not require equipment, and most people of all ages can do it.”

She says that a brisk walk is “as if you’re in a hurry, and is defined as a 3- to 4-mile per hour pace or a 15- to 20-minute mile.”

To prevent heart disease, Dr. Young encourages men to meet the National Physical Activity Guideline—150 minutes per week of moderate intensity physical activity.

“We are still learning about the detrimental effects of high daily sedentary time,” she says.

“At this point, there is no consensus on how much sedentary time is too much.

Plus, our study only asked about sitting time outside of work.

But given the number of health benefits from being physically active, people should find ways to put physical activity into their lives and spend less time sitting.”

At Kaiser Permanente, clinicians have initiated an “Exercise Vital Sign” program in which all members are asked about their physical activity at every outpatient visit.

“The information is recorded in their electronic health record and is available for the health care providers when they see the patient.

It provides an opportunity for the provider to counsel the patient on physical activity levels,” Dr. Young says.

She suggests that primary care physicians ask their patients about their regular physical activity.

“When it’s insufficient, patients need to hear that regular physical activity is important for their health.

Physicians can be powerful advocates in helping to promote this message.”

Tai Chi Good for the Heart

If you have heart failure and practice Tai Chi, you’ll feel better about your life, your mood will lift, and you’ll be more likely to keep on exercising.

Those are the results of the largest study of the effects of Tai Chi on heart failure, reported this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

“The multi-component nature of Tai Chi – the combination of physical exercise, stress reduction, and social support – along with its integration of multiple body systems makes it an ideal way to prevent and rehabilitate heart disease,” says one of the co-authors of the study, Peter Wayne, PhD. Director of Tai Chi and Mind-Body Research Programs, Harvard Medical School’s Osher Research Center.

“Tai Chi can potentially prevent and aid the management of heart disease by providing a form of aerobic exercise, more efficient breathing, improved circulation, greater muscle strength, stress reduction, mood elevation, and encouragement of behavior changes.”

Heart failure is a particularly hard disease to live with due to the shortness of breath and low energy that results from the heart’s inability to pump enough blood. “Historically, patients with chronic systolic heart failure were considered too frail to exercise and, through the late 1980s, avoidance of physical activity was a standard recommendation,” writes the authors, led by Harvard’s Gloria Yeh, MD, MPH.

The Harvard researchers recruited 100 people with chronic heart failure and randomly assigned half of them to receive a 12-week Tai Chi program designed specifically for heart failure. The other half got a heart health education program.

The Tai Chi program involved some traditional warm-up exercises, including arm swinging, gentle stretches, breathing, and visualization techniques.

Then patients learned five simple movements adapted from Master Cheng Man-Ch’ing’s Yang-style Tai Chi, which the Harvard researchers have subsequently used in other clinical trials, all funded by the National Institutes of Health.

The patients also received an instructional videotape, and were encouraged to practice Tai Chi at home at least 3 times a week.

After 12 weeks, the patients in the Tai Chi group showed greater improvements in quality of life, in feelings of well-being, and in the confidence to perform exercise-related activities, compared with the education group.

Importantly, more than three-quarters of the participants came to the Tai Chi classes and many continued to practice Tai Chi at home when the researchers checked up on them 6 months later.

“This tells us that Tai Chi is enjoyable and can be safely incorporated into regular activities, even if you have chronic heart disease,” says Wayne.