Posts Tagged ‘obese’

Men Left Out of Weight-Loss Market

Even though men are more likely to be overweight than women, men are not getting the weight-loss services they need.

Recent data from Britain is easily applied to the US, and around the world.

Using a Freedom of Information request, the Men’s Health Forum in Britain asked local authorities how many people had been helped by their weight-loss programs in 2013-2014.

The results show 110,324 women as compared with 29,919 men, suggesting that a woman is 277% (3½ times) more likely to get help with weight loss than a man, according to a news release.

Two-thirds of men in Britain are overweight or obese as compared with 57% of women.

Shocking Figures

“These figures are pretty shocking,” said Martin Tod, CEO of Men’s Health Forum.

“We want to see local councils making much bigger efforts to design their services to work for men.

This is particularly important because men account for three-quarters of premature deaths from coronary heart disease—and middle-aged men are twice as likely as women to get diabetes.”

According to a recent publication from the Men’s Health Forum, How To Make Weight-Loss Services Work For Men, there are several reasons for the gender gap.

These include poor advertising or marketing, services that are inappropriate or unattractive to men, and unsuitable venues or times.

Here is a summary of the highlights from the forum guide on what works with weight-loss for men:

Key lessons

1. Obesity prevention and treatment should take into account sex and gender-related differences.

2. Weight reduction for men is best achieved and maintained with the combination of a reducing diet, advice on physical activity, and behavior change techniques.

Men prefer more factual information on how to lose weight and more emphasis on physical activity than women.

3. Men-only groups may enhance effectiveness.

Group-based interventions should also provide some individual tailoring and individual feedback to male participants.

4. Weight-loss programs for men may be better provided in social settings, such as sports clubs and workplaces, which may be more successful at engaging men.

No Strict Diets, Please

In general, men express a dislike of “strict” diets.

Intermittent periods of dieting may be more effective for men than regular periods of dieting.

► Men particularly enjoy the use of pedometers to monitor their physical activity.

► Men prefer interventions that are individualized, fact-based, flexible, use business-like language, and include simple to understand information.

► Men are less likely than women to do well using the drug Orlistat to help long-term weight-loss maintenance.

► Men differ from women when it comes to encouraging them and maintaining participation in weight-loss programs.

Men are significantly less likely than women to join a weight-loss program, but once recruited they are less likely than women to drop out.

► Middle-aged men in particular, are more motivated to lose weight once they become aware that they have a health problem, for example, being diagnosed as “obese” by a health care professional.

Understanding the health benefits of losing weight can act as a motivator for men, for example, knowing that weight loss may prevent the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus or that weight reduction may improve erectile function.

Obese, Overweight Men Have Inferior Semen

Men who are overweight or obese have lower sperm counts and lower ejaculate volumes, according to the results of the first study to make this association in men who were trying to conceive, but who did not have known infertility.

“Our study provides further data showing the link between being overweight and sperm quality,” said lead author Dr. Michael Eisenberg of Stanford University School of Medicine.

“Most prior studies examined infertile men only, while our study examines all men who were trying to conceive.

Moreover, we looked at both body mass index (BMI) as well as waist circumference to determine the relationship with sperm production.”

Dr. Eisenberg and colleagues examined data from the Longitudinal Investigation of Fertility and the Environment Study, a population-based, prospective cohort of more than 500 couples attempting to conceive in Texas and Michigan.

They analyzed data from 468 men, mean age 32, the majority of whom (82%) were overweight or obese.

More than half said they participated in physical activity less than once a week.

Fewer than 10% had a low sperm count.

The researchers reported their results online on December 4, 2013 in the journal Human Reproduction.

When the researchers examined semen parameters, they found that ejaculate volume declined with increasing BMI and waist circumference.

Similarly, the total sperm count showed a linear decline with waist circumference.

A man in the normal BMI range had an ejaculate volume of 3.3 mL, compared with 2.8 mL for men who were severely obese.

Men with the largest waists, more than 40 inches, had about 22% lower total sperm count compared with men who had waist measurements under 37 inches.

The percentage of men with abnormal volume, concentration, and total sperm increased with increasing body size.

There was no significant relationship seen between body size and other fertility factors, including semen concentration, motility, vitality, morphology, or DNA fragmentation index.

“Body size as measured by BMI or waist circumference is negatively associated with semen parameters, with little influence of physical activity,” Dr. Eisenberg noted.

The Heavier Man, The Lower the Sperm Count

The heavier the man, the higher the chances of a low sperm count, he suggested.

“I think bringing attention to another adverse outcome of obesity is important,” Dr. Eisenberg said.

“Men need to know that in addition to health aspects, obesity may also impair reproductive goals.”

It’s still unknown what a reduction in body weight does to the sperm counts of men starting with a low sperm count, Dr. Eisenberg noted.

“We don’t have a good answer at this point,” he said.

“However, we do know that weight loss helps overall health, so at a minimum we can expect a health benefit for an overweight man who loses weight.”

Dr. Eisenberg stated that primary care physicians need to “bring awareness to this relationship.

This may provide another motivation for men to change lifestyle habits, knowing that it can impact fertility.”

In addition, as men discuss plans for starting a family, this study can provide important information as to who may be at risk for impaired fertility, he noted.